EAC Logo

Pandemic Preparedness News

Support to Pandemic Preparedness in the EAC Region

The EAC Secretariat and the EAC Partner States have declared the fight against infectious diseases a health priority for the region. The “Support to Pandemic Preparedness in the EAC Region” project, being implemented by GIZ on behalf of the German Government, assists the EAC Secretariat to improve the regional preparedness and response capacity. It contributes to putting the East African Community regional contingency plan into practice and to implementing the regional risk and crisis communication strategy.

The project also advises the Secretariat on the sustainable integration of ‘One Health’. This approach involves professional disciplines and sectors of society that play an important role in preventing and responding to outbreaks of infectious diseases and in mitigating its impact.

The project offers technical expertise and builds capacity with the overall aim of strengthening EAC in its coordinating and advisory role for the Partner States in pandemic preparedness. It is practice-oriented and pursues a participative approach. The project contributes to a uniform, effective, responsible and balanced approach to pandemic preparedness at the regional and national government level.

Documents

EAC Regional Strategy and Plan

           EAC Standard Operating Procedures

PanPrep Press Catalogues

          PanPrep Project Publications

 

Videomaterial

Highlights films on Cross border Field Simulation between Kenya and Tanzania, June 2019.
 

Diseases Do Not Respect Borders - A highlights film on Cross border Field Simulation between Kenya and Tanzania, June 2019.

 
 

The Role of Points of Entry in Pandemic Preparedness.
 

Speaking with One Voice -The role of risk and crisis communication in pandemic prevention and response.

 

Timothy Wesonga - My lessons learned from the field simulation exercise
Lessons for the Future – What East African experts learned from fighting Ebola in West Africa, International Conference in Nairobi, 2017:
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 

Disease Prevention and Control Unit

The disease prevention and control unit is addressing the following key strategic interventions:

  • Establishing EAC regional information exchange system for communicable and non-communicable diseases;
  • Establishing a supranational regional reference public health laboratory and strengthening national public health laboratories;
  • Strengthening promotive, preventive, curative and rehabilitative health services for non-communicable diseases; and
  • Strengthening the capacity of EAC Partner States to diagnose and treat communicable and non-communicable diseases.

In line with the interventions listed above, the Disease Prevention and control unit is currently, implementing two projects. These are:

The East African Public Health Laboratory Networking Project (EAPHLNP)

The EAPHLNP is a World Bank-funded project that is being implemented by the EAC Partner States in collaboration with the East African Community Secretariat, the East Central and Southern Africa Health Community, the US Centres for Disease Prevention and Control and the World Health Organization. The objective of the project is “to establish a network of efficient, high quality, accessible public health laboratories for the diagnosis and surveillance of Tuberculosis and other communicable diseases”.

The project supports 25 satellite laboratories in East Africa. The laboratories have been selected by the EAC Partner States based on their proximity to or location in border areas which are known to have large numbers of vulnerable populations, including migrants and / or refugees; high risk of disease outbreaks; and, are predominant with indigenous populations. The EAPHLNP aims to achieve the following:

  • Enhanced access to diagnostic services for vulnerable groups to contain the spread of diseases in the border areas;
  • Improved capacity to provide specialised diagnostic services and conducting drug resistance monitoring at regional level;
  • Improved capacity for disease surveillance and emergency preparedness efforts through the availability of timely laboratory data to provide early warning of public health events; and
  • Establishing a platform for conducting training and research.

 

The East African Integrated Disease Surveillance Network (EAIDSNet)

 The EAIDSNet is a regional collaborative initiative of the national ministries of the EAC Partner States responsible for human and animal health, in collaboration with the national health research and academic institutions. With implementation support by the Rockefeller Foundation, the main objectives of the initiative are:

  • Enhance and strengthen cross-country and cross-institutional collaboration through regional coordination of activities for the prevention and control of both human and animal (zoonotic) diseases under the “One Health” Initiative;
  • Promote exchange and dissemination of appropriate information on Integrated Disease Surveillance and other disease control activities;
  • Harmonise integrated disease surveillance systems in the region;
  • Strengthen capacity for implementing integrated disease surveillance and control activities; and
  • Ensure continuous exchange of expertise and best practices for integrated disease surveillance and control.

 

Support to Pandemic Preparedness in the EAC Region

 The EAC Secretariat and the EAC Partner States have declared the fight against infectious diseases a health priority for the region. The “Support to Pandemic Preparedness in the EAC Region” project, being implemented by GIZ on behalf of the German Government, assists the EAC Secretariat to improve the regional preparedness and response capacity. It contributes to putting the East African Community regional contingency plan into practice and to implementing the regional risk and crisis communication strategy.

The project also advises the Secretariat on the sustainable integration of ‘One Health’. This approach involves professional disciplines and sectors of society that play an important role in preventing and responding to outbreaks of infectious diseases and in mitigating its impact.

The project offers technical expertise and builds capacity with the overall aim of strengthening EAC in its coordinating and advisory role for the Partner States in pandemic preparedness. It is practice-oriented and pursues a participative approach. The project contributes to a uniform, effective, responsible and balanced approach to pandemic preparedness at the regional and national government level


About Editorial Board | Contact


 Volume 1 | Issue 1

TABLE OF CONTENTS

EDITORIAL

Introduction to the First Issue of East Africa Science: Search, Discover, Develop
Fabian M. Mashauri, Harriet Nabudere

COMMENTARY

United Kingdom–East and Southern Africa Partnership at the Forefront of Developing the First Ever Test that Measures Patient Tuberculosis Burden in Hours
Wilber Sabiiti on behalf of the MBLA development stakeholders

ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Mobile Health in Uganda: A Case Study of the Medical Concierge Group
Louis H. Kamulegeya, Joseph Ssebwana, Wilson Abigaba, John M. Bwanika, Davis Musinguzi

Prevalence and Distribution of Multidrug-Resistant Mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Tanzania
John C. Mgogwe, Hadija H. Semvua, Oliva Safari, Gibson E. Kapanda, Balthazar M. Nyombi, Jaffu O. Chilongola

Prevalence and Genetic Diversity of Hepatitis B and C Viruses Among Couples Attending Antenatal Care in a Rural Community in Rwanda
Onesphore Majyambere, Andrew K. Nyerere, Louis S. Nkaka, Nadine Rujeni, Raphael L. Wekessa

Prevalence of Wuchereria bancrofti Infection in Mosquitoes from Pangani District, Northeastern Tanzania
Godlisten S. Materu

Biological Activity of Sumilarv 0.5G against Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto and Anopheles arabiensis in Northern Tanzania
Eliningaya J. Kweka, Aneth M. Mahande, Shandala Msangi, Subira Sayumwe, Johnson O. Ouma, Violet Temba, Lucile J. Lyaruu, Yousif E. Himeidan

Determination and Quantification of Gallic Acid in Raw Propolis by High- performance Liquid Chromatography–Diode Array Detector in Burundi
Ramadhan Nyandwi, Ayşe S. Kılıç, Meltem Çelik, Hasan H. Oruç

REVIEW

Congenital Zika Virus Infection Paradigm: What is in the Wardrobe? A Narrative Review
Mariam M. Mirambo, Lucas Matemba, Mtebe Majigo, Stephen E. Mshana

 


ABOUT EASci

East Africa Science (EASci) is a no-fee, open-access, peer-reviewed journal published online at www.eahealth.org. It is published two times per year by the East African Health Research Commission. EAHRC, which is based in Bujumbura, Burundi is an institution of the East African Community (EAC). EAC is an East African Regional Economic Community with its headquarters in Arusha, Tanzania. EASci is editorially independent and does not necessarily represent the views or positions of the East African Community.

East Africa Science is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are properly cited. To view a copy of this license, visit: http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by/4.0/. For further information, please contact the editors at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Gibson Kibiki, MD, MMed, PhD, Executive Secretary, East African Health Research Commission, Burundi


ASSOCIATE EDITORS

Jacqueline Aber, MSc, Mbarara University, Uganda

Happiness H. Kumburu, PhD, Kilimanjaro Clinical Research Institute, Tanzania

Geoffrey Mutisya Maitha, MSc, AIDS Healthcare Foundation, Kenya

Lina Sara Mathew, MSc, Baharel Ghazal University, South Sudan

Irene Mremi, MSc, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania

Ella Larrissa Ndoricyimpaye, MSc, University of Rwanda, Rwanda

Sandra Nkurunziza, MD, MPH, University of Burundi, Burundi

Ramadhani Nyandwi, MSc, University of Burundi, Burundi

Violet Asiko Ongaya, MSc, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Kenya

Naasson Tuyiringire, MSc, Rwanda Biomedical Centre, Rwanda


MANAGING EDITOR

Harriet Nabudere, MBChB, MPH, Uganda National Health Research Organisation, Uganda


 EDITORIAL BOARD

Prof Bennon Asiimwe, PhD, Mbarara University, Uganda

Dr Quirijn de Mast, MD, PhD, Radboud University Medical Center, The Netherlands

Prof Stephen Gillespie, MD, FRCP, University of St Andrews, UK

Prof Ben Hamel, MD, PhD, Radboud University Medical Center, The Netherlands

Prof Scott Heysell, MD, University of Virginia, USA

Prof Eric Houpt, MD, University of Virginia, USA

Prof Sam Kariuki, PhD, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Kenya

Prof Pierre Claver Kayumba, PhD, University of Rwanda, Rwanda

Dr John Kiiru, PhD, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Kenya

Prof Ole Lund, PhD, Technical University, Denmark

Dr Stephen Magesa, PhD, President’s Malaria Initiatives, Tanzania

Dr Alphaxard Manjurano, PhD, National Institute for Medical Research, Tanzania

Dr Stella Mpagama, MD, PhD, Kibong’oto Infectious Diseases Hospital, Tanzania

Prof Leon Mutesa, MD, PhD, University of Rwanda, Rwanda

Dr Jean de Dieu Ngirabega, MD, PhD, East African Health Research Commission, Burundi

Prof Joseph Nyandwi, MD, PhD, University of Burundi, Burundi

Prof Stephen Rulisa, MD, PhD, University of Rwanda, Rwanda

Dr Wilber Sabiiti, PhD, University of St Andrews, Scotland

Prof Thor Theander, MD, DSc, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Prof David P Towers, PhD, University of Warwick, UK

Prof Andre van der Ven, MD, PhD, Radboud University Medical Centre, The Netherlands

Prof Mirjam van Reisen, PhD, Leiden University, The Netherlands

Prof Alimuddun Zumla, MD, FRCP, University College London, UK


CONTACT

For further information, please contact the editors at: eahrc-admin[at]eahealth.org


CREDITS

   EAHRC logo        eac logo copy 1

 

EAC Cross-Border Field Simulation Exercises

The EAC region has experienced a number of outbreaks of infectious diseases in the past. These include Ebola, Rift Valley, Marburg and Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic fevers, Cholera, Polio, Hepatitis A and B and many more. Six out of ten are zoonosis, diseases which are transmitted between animals and humans. In order to prevent outbreaks that can jeopardize public health, economic stability and the lives and livelihoods of the EAC region, Partner States need to be prepared. Simulation exercises play a key role in analysing the state of pandemic preparedness and response capacities. They help to identify strengths and weaknesses and the necessary corrective actions.

Against this backdrop, the EAC Secretariat conducted a cross-border table top exercise (TTX) from 4 - 5 September 2018. A cross-border field simulation exercise (FSX) followed from 11 - 14 June 2019 at Namanga on the Kenya Tanzanian border. The exercise involved representatives from the EAC Partner States, especially from Kenya and Tanzania, and followed the One Health approach. The simulation aimed to assess both regional and national contingency plans and standard operating procedures, readiness and compliance with the International Health Regulations.

A simulation exercise is a form of practice, training, monitoring or evaluation of capabilities involving the description or simulation of an emergency, to which a described or simulated response is made. Simulation exercises can help to develop, assess and test functional capabilities of emergency systems, procedures and mechanisms.

Simulation exercises are training and quality assurance tools, which provide an evidence-based assessment for monitoring, testing and strengthening of functional capacities to respond to outbreaks and public health emergencies. As a training tool, they allow participants to learn and practice emergency response procedures in a safe and controlled environment. As a quality assurance tool, exercises test and evaluate emergency policies, plans and procedures. Simulation exercises play a key role in the development and implementation of preparedness and response capacities at all levels (national, regional, community and global) and have been identified as a key component in the validation of core capacities under the International Health Regulations monitoring and evaluation framework (2015).

The simulations were facilitated by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH on behalf of the German Government through the “Support to Pandemic Preparedness in the EAC Region” (PanPrep) project. The World Health Organization (WHO) led and coordinated the process. Further, international organisations cooperated in the exercises to use joint forces and utilize synergies. A task-based Steering Group (SG) oversaw the preparations and an Exercise Management Group (EMG) designed, planned and implemented the exercise.

This page provides core documents and other materials related to the Table Top and the Field Simulation Exercises.

Documents


National Strategies and Plans

          

Cross-border Field Simulation Exercise Documents

 
Lessons Learned

 

Videomaterial

Highlights films on Cross border Field Simulation between Kenya and Tanzania, June 2019.
 

Diseases Do Not Respect Borders - A highlights film on Cross border Field Simulation between Kenya and Tanzania, June 2019.

 
 

The Role of Points of Entry in Pandemic Preparedness.
 

Speaking with One Voice -The role of risk and crisis communication in pandemic prevention and response.

 

Timothy Wesonga - My lessons learned from the field simulation exercise

 Photo Gallery

MG 4477 copy

MG 4477 copy

61A1270 copy

61A1270 copy

61A0986 copy

61A0986 copy

61A1127 copy

61A1127 copy

61A1193 copy

61A1193 copy

61A0945 copy

61A0945 copy

MG 4495 copy

MG 4495 copy

61A1055 copy

61A1055 copy

61A1927 copy

61A1927 copy

N2A0088 copy

N2A0088 copy

61A0915 copy

61A0915 copy

61A0821 copy

61A0821 copy

N2A0233 copy

N2A0233 copy

N2A0380 copy

N2A0380 copy

LIC8898 copy

LIC8898 copy

61A1437 copy

61A1437 copy

61A1123 copy

61A1123 copy

18A4409 copy

18A4409 copy

MG 4542 copy

MG 4542 copy

MG 4534 copy

MG 4534 copy


East African Community
EAC Close
Afrika Mashariki Road
P.O. Box 1096
Arusha
United Republic of Tanzania

Tel: +255 (0)27 216 2100
Fax: +255 (0)27 216 2190
Email: eac@eachq.org